New Urban Agenda

New Urban Agenda

The New Urban Agenda represents a shared vision for a better and more sustainable future – one in which all people have equal rights and access to the benefits and opportunities that cities can offer, and in which the international community reconsiders the urban systems and physical form of our urban spaces to achieve this. In this unprecedented era of increasing urbanization, and in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Paris Agreement, and other global development agreements and frameworks, we have reached a critical point in understanding that cities can be the source of solutions to, rather than the cause of, the challenges that our world is facing today. If well-planned and well-managed, urbanization can be a powerful tool for sustainable development for both developing and developed countries.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries – developed and developing – in a global partnership. They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests.

SG Policy Brief: COVID-19 in an Urban World

SG Policy Brief: COVID-19 in an Urban World

The UN Secretary-General has launched the UN Comprehensive Response to COVID-19 to save lives, protect societies, recover better. As part of the response, the UN Secretary-General is issuing policy briefs to provide ideas to governments on how to address the consequences of this crisis and COVID-19 in an urban world is part of this series .

The Policy Brief describes how cities can manage the pandemic and emerge as the hubs of energy, resilience and innovation that make them such vibrant and appealing places for many to live. It also looks at how the pandemic has exposed deep inequalities in how people live in cities, and how cities serve their residents, with the most vulnerable suffering the most. The Policy Brief calls for conscious policy choices, particularly with respect to inequalities, local capacities and a green, inclusive recovery. The UN agencies involved in writing the Brief included UN-Habitat, UNDP, UNDESA, UNEP, UNICEF, UNODC, ILO, WHO, OHCHR, all Regional Economic Commissions and several local government networks were also engaged in this process.

UNCDF Urban Economic Recovery and Resilience Diagnostic and Planning Tool

UNCDF Urban Economic Recovery and Resilience Diagnostic and Planning Tool

The Diagnostic and Planning Tool (DPT) has a two-fold objective: (1) to help cities understand the strengths and weaknesses of their institutional and operating arrangements from the perspective of economic recovery and resilience building as well as to assess the structure and functioning of city economies to get a clear understanding of the economic performance/standing of each city and how this defines vulnerability and resilience; and (2) to define a process for the design and implementation of recovery plans/strategies to address the identified gaps, accelerate better recovery and improve longer-term resilience. The planning tool/component addresses “What”– key components of recovery planning and “How”– process for designing and implementing a recovery plan. Consequently, the DPT consists of two parts. The first part describes the diagnostic whereas the second part focuses on the planning aspect.